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                                                        DR. DAN PETERSON

                                                                      1415 SAGE STREET ~ GERING, NEBRASKA 69341 
                                                             
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GUM DISEASE AND HOW TO IMPROVE BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS

GUM TISSUE INFECTION (periodontal disease) , MAY WORSEN BLOOD SUGAR CONTROL!

Periodontal disease is the sixth complication of diabetes.

   Poorly controlled diabetes is associated with increased gum tissue swelling, bleeding and risk for periodontal (gum tissue) destruction.

Diabetes Good Control=Similar gum tissue status as nondiabetic

Diabetes[[[Poor Control=h Gum tissue swelling

                                                 h Attachment loss

                                                 h Bone loss 

     Diabetes can place an individual at a three-fold increased risk towards developing periodontal disease and a fourfold increased risk of progressive bone loss. These factors are most affected by the degree of metabolic control of blood sugar levels.  

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    Poor blood sugar control appears to play a determinant role in the risk for gum disease.  

     The more poorly controlled the diabetic state, the greater the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease resulting in deeper periodontal pocketing and greater bone and attachment loss.

     Diabetes influences the gum tissue by:

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Vascular changes in blood vessels causing tissue damage or loss of function.

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 Glycation of proteins at twice the normal level which significantly alters the way cells interact with one another within the gum tissue.

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Changes in collagen metabolism, a major component of periodontal connective tissue, leading to decreased blood flow that may change tissue resistance to bacterial attack and impair the healing process.

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Increased collagenase activity which results in altered wound healing.

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Increased glucose levels in the gingival areas which also change wound healing.

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Altered immune response.

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GUM TISSUE INFECTION (periodontal disease) , MAY WORSEN BLOOD SUGAR CONTROL!

   Have you ever considered? 

     The total area of gum tissue that is infected with bacteria in moderate to advanced gum disease is at least as large as the palm of your hand!  Now, if you had an area of infection this size anywhere else on your body you would be very concerned and probably demanding treatment from your doctor.  

     An area of bacteria infection this size in the periodontium can have widespread systemic effects...one of those being a possible six fold increased risk of poor blood sugar control!  

     Poor blood sugar control is a major risk factor for the classic diabetic complications and possibly other complications.

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PERIODONTAL TREATMENT  (Root Planing and Scaling)

     Systemic infection frequently results in a need for increased insulin dosages.  Periodontal (gum infection) disease may have a widespread systemic effect which can cause an increase insulin resistance and worsen glycemic control.

   Scaling and root planing  along with systemic doxycycline is a treatment designed to:

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 Eliminate bacterial organisms 

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 Reduce gum tissue swelling 

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 Improve gum tissue health

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 Restore insulin sensitivity over time.

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 Some diabetics have even been able to decrease their insulin requirements.

     So good blood sugar control can keep your gum tissue healthy.  Poor diabetic control can lead to gum disease and infection that can affect your blood sugar control; wound healing; increase medication dosage and cause insulin insensitivity.

     If you have gum disease, periodontal disease,  we encourage you to get treatment as soon as possible to help keep your blood sugar levels within normal range in order to help prevent the complications of diabetes.

Research source: Compendium, November 2000,  Diabetes and Periodontal Disease: Two Sides of a Coin.  Dr Brian Mealey pg 943-953.

02/06/2008

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          If you have any questions please e-mail me at: drdpeterson@scottsbluff.net
                                                                                 308-436-3491 Office number

PLEASE NOTE: The information contained herein is intended for educational purposes only.  It is not intended and should not be construed as the delivery of dental/medical care and is not a substitute for personal hands on dental/medical attention, diagnosis or treatment.  Persons requiring diagnosis, treatment, or with specific questions are urged to contact your family dental/health care provider for appropriate care.
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