Click here to return Home         FAMILY GENTLE DENTAL CARE
                                                        DR. DAN PETERSON

                                                                      1415 SAGE STREET ~ GERING, NEBRASKA 69341 
                                                             
      Call: 308-436-3491       www.dentalgentlecare.com           

| Home | Our Office |Our Services | Staff | Patient Education | Site Map |

DANGER ZONE

Click here to see a larger version of the three factors that must be present for tooth decay

 Tooth Decay Forces

   Three forces must be present for dental decay to occur:

bullet

An unprotected tooth

bullet

Bacteria in dental plaque

bullet

An energy source (like sugar) for the bacteria

Cavity Formation Signs and Symptoms Self-Test

Up To Top

   The bacteria in the plaque uses its food source (sugars in the mouth) to create acid which attacks the enamel of the teeth causing the DANGER ZONE to be present in your mouth.  If any one of these three factors is removed, dental decay will be prevented!

     A reversible chalky white spot is the first manifestation of disease which may lead to a cavity.

Dental Abscess Self Test

Up To Top

   So for an unprotected tooth you can protect it with:

bullet

Sealants

bullet

Fluoride

bullet

Brushing and flossing

    For bacteria in plaque you can prevent this with:

bullet

Brush and floss

bullet

Avoid sweets or eat with meals

bullet

Fluoride

Up To Top

    Limit the energy sources for bacteria through:

bullet

Brushing and flossing

bullet

Avoid sweets

bullet

Brush or swish after eating

bullet

Use sugar free foods

bullet

Limit snacks and pop containing sugar

Caries activity describes the status of the caries process as getting worse (demineralization) or getting better ( remineralization).  Caries risk describes the status of the whole patient.  It can be defined as the likelihood of the patient getting a new cavity.

Offense (things that cause cavities): bacteria, sugar use 3 or more times/day between meals, not brushing or flossing, dry mouth.

Defense(things that helps teeth): normal salivary flow, high levels of fluoride, past history of cavities, medical history. A Paradigm Shift for Caries Diagnosis and Treatment, Dr. Steinberg, Dental Equipment & Materials , pg 78-79, 6/2004

Up To To

Dental Disease Affects Health

Association between Dental Caries Activity and Coronary  Heart Disease Severity
      
The link between dental diseases and a wide range of systemic  medical conditions has recently acquired increased attention. Periodontal disease, in particular, has been implicated as a marker of cardiac disease. Dental caries, the most common oral infection,  should be considered as a potential risk factor for all systemic  diseases. Few studies have investigated this association. To investigate the potential relationship between dental caries  activity, dental plaque levels and presence of mutans streptococci (Ms) in saliva (independent variables) and coronary  heart disease (CHD) severity (dependent variable). Methods: 219 cardiac patients in a hospital cardiac clinic were included. Dental  caries activity was evaluated by the "D" or "untreated" component of the DMFT index , dental plaque was measured according to the Turesky  index, and the number (CFU\ml) of salivary Ms were measured on
MSB-agar. CHD severity was assessed according to extent of vessel  blockage; function and size of left ventricle

According to results of LV-Gram catheterization; Stress tests were categorized by physiological symptoms of CHD; previous hospitalization (due to CHD) was recorded. Results: Previously hospitalized patients due to CHD had 3.03 untreated carious teeth as compared with 1.84 among patients not previously hospitalized (Mann-Whitney,p=0.032). Levels of MS were lowest among patients who had no coronary blockage: 11.63 million CFU\ml, as compared to patients with single, double, or triple vessel blockage: 12.97,30.64, 21.11 million CFU\ml respectively (ANOVA, p=0.031). Plaque index levels were lowest among patients with no coronary blockage (2.80) as compared with patients with single, double or triple vessel blockage: 3.56, 3.31, 3.54 respectively (ANOVA, p=0.049).
Conclusions: These data consistently indicate a potential association between dental caries activity and CHD severity and emphasize the role of preventive dentistry in the promotion of general health.

H.D. SGAN-COHEN1, M.N. SELA1, M. ANGIE1, and M. MOSSERI2, 1Hebrew University - Hadassah School of Dental Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel, 2Hebrew University - Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel Seq #56 - Epidemiology10:45 AM-12:45 PM, Thursday, 10 March 2005 Baltimore Convention Center 331

Up To To

New Clue to Tooth Decay Could Lead to Dental Advances

A study comparing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a group of small proteins that occur naturally in human saliva and act like antibiotics against oral bacteria, could lead to new ways to screen children for
risk of tooth decay and protect them against this common, chronic problem.
Oral examinations performed on 149 middle school children. Researchersat the University of Washington in Seattle set out to determine a possible correlation between dental caries prevalence in children and salivary concentrations of three types of antimicrobial peptides. Results found that children with no tooth decay had higher levels of one particular type of AMP (alpha defensin) than children with tooth decay. The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research,
part of the Nation al Institutes of Health, funded the study.
The study, "Salivary Antimicrobial Peptide Expression and Dental Caries Experience in Children," published in the September 2005 issue of the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 1/06
 

Resource: Oral Care Report, Harvard School, Volume 10, Number 2001

Up To To

          Back   Home  Site Map   Patient Education    Fillings Guide

 

          If you have any questions please e-mail me at: drdpeterson@scottsbluff.net
                                                                                 308-436-3491 Office number

PLEASE NOTE: The information contained herein is intended for educational purposes only.  It is not intended and should not be construed as the delivery of dental/medical care and is not a substitute for personal hands on dental/medical attention, diagnosis or treatment.  Persons requiring diagnosis, treatment, or with specific questions are urged to contact your family dental/health care provider for appropriate care.
This site is privately and personally sponsored, funded and supported by Dr. Peterson.  We have no outside funding.
Confidentiality of data including your identity, is respected  by this Web site. We undertake to honor or exceed the legal requirements of medical/health information privacy that apply in Nebraska.

Copyright 1998-2008 Family Gentle Dental Care, all rights reserved.